Gaia Pulses is a food project centred around Organic Pulses and inspired by traditional Greek recipes handed down through generations of mothers and, who knows, maybe even the Gods themselves! 
Pulses are very low on fat and packed with protein & fibre. They're the food of the Gods because they induce brain activity, keep us full for longer and offer long lasting energy...
‘Gaia Pulses’ has two meanings:
 

The Pulses of the Earth (Beans, Lentils, Chic Peas)

&

The Earth Pulses has a beat, a breath. The Earth is alive. 

 

                                                                             We are all one and this planet is our home, our body.

 

About Gaia 

Historically, Gaia was the ancient Greek Goddess of Earth who, in Hesiod's Theogony of 700 BC, was the 'first to arise from chaos'.


In the Homeric Hymn to Gaia of 500 BC, she was called 'Mother of all, the oldest one, the foundation'. 


Yet the term 'Gaia' is even older than Greece, coming from India a thousand years before. In Sanskrit, Gaya meant 'Moving Song' and, as the Gayatri Mantra, was the first hymn to arise from the original seed sound of Om.

 

 

Pulses in Greek History

The Greeks from the ancient times recognised the numerous advantages of eating pulses so they cultivated them passionately.

There was a ceremony dedicated to the god Apollo, the second most important god after Zeus during which the Athenians were thanking him for the Harvest by preparing a bean stew for the entire city.

Even Theseus cooked one of those stews with the few beans he had left in his boat to thank Apollo when he returned from Crete in one piece after having killed the notorious Minotaur.

 

 

Etymology

Gaia

(gay-ə or gah-yə; from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē,Ge, "land" or "earth";[1] in ancient Greek religion, was the personification of the Earth[2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia was the primal Greek Mother Goddess; creator and giver of birth to the Earth and all the Universe; the heavenly gods, the Titans, and the Giants were born to her. The gods reigning over their classical pantheon were born from her union with Uranus (the sky), while the sea-gods were born from her union with Pontus (the sea).

Pulse noun \ˈpəls\

A pulse (Latin: puls,[1] from Ancient Greek πολτός: poltos "porridge"),[2] sometimes called a "grain legume"

1a:  the regular expansion of an artery caused by the ejection of blood into the arterial system by the contractions of the heart   b:  the palpable beat resulting from such pulse as detected in a superficial artery; 

2: indication of vitality

 

 

 

 

 

Gaia is shown rising up from the ground surrounded by dancing Panes. The goat-headed spirits symbolise natural fertility. 

Gaia rising from the earth, Athenian red-figure kylix C5th B.C., Antikenmuseen, Berlin

Gaia rising from the earth, Athenian red-figure kylix C5th B.C., Antikenmuseen, Berlin

The celebration of the harvest dedicated to Apollo, in Athens 5th century B.C.

The celebration of the harvest dedicated to Apollo, in Athens 5th century B.C.

Theseus killing the notorious Minotaur

Theseus killing the notorious Minotaur